Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2019, Page: 31-40
Load Bearing Strength of Innovative I-Shapes of Cold Formed Steel Sections
Lokendra Kaushal, Department of Civil Engineering, Future Institute of Engineering & Technology, Bareilly, India
Mohd Rashid, Department of Civil Engineering, Rajshree Institute of Engineering & Technology, Bareilly, India
Received: Oct. 2, 2019;       Accepted: Oct. 18, 2019;       Published: Oct. 25, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijimse.20190404.11      View  30      Downloads  6
Abstract
In recent years, cold formed steel sections are used more and more as primary framing components as well as secondary structural systems. The geometry can significantly influence the stability response of cold formed steel members. This reportis an investigation concerning the structural behavior of the cold formed steel beams and their failure modes. The beam profile is cold formed steel section and experimental procedure on cold formed steel section is conducted. Thin sheet steel products are extensively used in building industry, and range from purlins to roof sheeting and floor decking. Generally, these are available for use as basic building elements for assembly at site or as prefabricated frames or panels. These thin steel sections are cold-formed, i.e. their manufacturing process involves forming steel sections in a cold state (i.e. without application of heat) from steel sheets of uniform thickness. Sometimes they are also called Light Gauge Steel Sections or Cold Rolled Steel Sections. The thickness of steel sheet used in cold formed section construction was 3.1 mm. The method of manufacturing is important as it differentiates these products from hot rolled steel sections. Normally, the yield strength of steel sheets used in cold-formed sections is at least 280 N/mm2, although there is a trend to use steels of higher strengths, and sometimes as low as 230 N/mm2.
Keywords
Load Bearing Strength, Cold Formed Steel Sheets, Innovative I-section, UTM Machine, Pressing Machine
To cite this article
Lokendra Kaushal, Mohd Rashid, Load Bearing Strength of Innovative I-Shapes of Cold Formed Steel Sections, International Journal of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2019, pp. 31-40. doi: 10.11648/j.ijimse.20190404.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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